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THE FUTURE OF MEDIA STARTS.... HERE

CyberJournalist.net is the premier news and resource site about how the digital technology is transforming the media.

CyberJournalist.net has been named a top 100 digital media site by Cnet, recommended by dozens of publications, from the Columbia Journalism Review to Vanity Fair to USA TODAY, and been visited by readers in more than 200 countries.

CyberJournalist.net is published by Jonathan Dube, an award-winning digital media executive who founded the site in 2000. Dube is the former SVP & GM of AOL News & Information and Past President of the Online News Association.

Publishers are doing all they can to wring out more value from their existing body of content. The most common technique is to resurface popular old stories that (even just barely) pertain to a trending topic: Publishers will republish or re-share old bits of viral content in the hopes of striking traffic gold once again. People watch reruns on television, the thinking goes, so why not bring that approach to digital content? (via <a href=”http://digiday.com/publishers/publishers-evergreen-content-strategy-make-the-old-new-again/”>Publishers have an updated evergreen strategy: Make the old new again | Digiday</a>)

Publishers are doing all they can to wring out more value from their existing body of content. The most common technique is to resurface popular old stories that (even just barely) pertain to a trending topic: Publishers will republish or re-share old bits of viral content in the hopes of striking traffic gold once again. People watch reruns on television, the thinking goes, so why not bring that approach to digital content? (via <a href=”http://digiday.com/publishers/publishers-evergreen-content-strategy-make-the-old-new-again/”>Publishers have an updated evergreen strategy: Make the old new again | Digiday</a>)

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

MIT’s Tangible Media is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, like a table of living clay:

brucesterling:

designculturemind:

Tangible Media

MIT’s Tangible Media is coming along nicely,

"Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning."

*The tie-in with the projection-mapping is especially good.

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from Emergent Futures Tumblelog

Source youtube.com

"The most dangerous thought you can have as a creative person is to think you know what you’re doing."

Brett Victor, talking at a Dropbox conference, takes attendees back to the year 1973, donning the uniform of an IBM systems engineer of the times, delivering his presentation on an overhead projector. The ’60s and early ’70s were a fertile time for CS ideas, reminds Victor, but even more importantly, it was a time of unfettered thinking, unconstrained by programming dogma, authority, and tradition. ‘The most dangerous thought that you can have as a creative person is to think that you know what you’re doing,’ explains Victor. ‘Because once you think you know what you’re doing you stop looking around for other ways of doing things and you stop being able to see other ways of doing things. You become blind.’ He concludes, ‘I think you have to say: “We don’t know what programming is. We don’t know what computing is. We don’t even know what a computer is.” And once you truly understand that, and once you truly believe that, then you’re free, and you can think anything.’”

Presented at Dropbox’s DBX conference on July 9, 2013.
All of the slides are available here: http://worrydream.com/dbx/

Posted on Wednesday, July 16th 2014

Google News has created an experimental newsroom in San Francisco to monitor the World Cup and turn popular search results into viral content, NPR reports.

But interestingly, Google is choosing to steer clear of negative headlines. 

"We’re also quite keen not to rub salt into the wounds," producer Sam Clohesy says, "and a negative story about Brazil won’t necessarily get a lot of traction in social."

Mobile marketing expert Rakesh Agrawal, CEO of reDesign mobile, says that’s just generally true. “People on social networks like Twitter and Facebook — they generally tend to share happy thoughts. If my son had an A in math today, I’m going to share that. But if my son got an F in math, that’s generally not something you’re going to see on social media.”

In old-school newsrooms, the saying goes: if it bleeds, it leads. Because this new newsroom is focused on getting content onto everyone’s smartphone, Agrawal says, editors may have another bias: to comb through the big data in search of happy thoughts.

Posted on Thursday, July 10th 2014

U say UI, I say UX: Who Does What? A designer&#8217;s guide to the tech industry, and how companies like Apple, Facebook and Google describe their design jobs.

U say UI, I say UX: Who Does What? A designer’s guide to the tech industry, and how companies like Apple, Facebook and Google describe their design jobs.

Posted on Wednesday, July 9th 2014

If I’d listened to customers, I’d have given them a faster horse.

Henry Ford

Posted on Wednesday, July 17th 2013

It may seem minor, but the new “thank” button in Wikipedia is a MAJOR leap forward. Signaling appreciation changes community dynamics

Andrew Lih, aka @fuzheado

Posted on Sunday, July 7th 2013