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THE FUTURE OF MEDIA STARTS.... HERE

CyberJournalist.net is the premier news and resource site about how the digital technology is transforming the media.

CyberJournalist.net has been named a top 100 digital media site by Cnet, recommended by dozens of publications, from the Columbia Journalism Review to Vanity Fair to USA TODAY, and been visited by readers in more than 200 countries.

CyberJournalist.net is published by Jonathan Dube, an award-winning digital media executive who founded the site in 2000. Dube is the former SVP & GM of AOL News & Information and Past President of the Online News Association.

Publishers are doing all they can to wring out more value from their existing body of content. The most common technique is to resurface popular old stories that (even just barely) pertain to a trending topic: Publishers will republish or re-share old bits of viral content in the hopes of striking traffic gold once again. People watch reruns on television, the thinking goes, so why not bring that approach to digital content? (via <a href=”http://digiday.com/publishers/publishers-evergreen-content-strategy-make-the-old-new-again/”>Publishers have an updated evergreen strategy: Make the old new again | Digiday</a>)

Publishers are doing all they can to wring out more value from their existing body of content. The most common technique is to resurface popular old stories that (even just barely) pertain to a trending topic: Publishers will republish or re-share old bits of viral content in the hopes of striking traffic gold once again. People watch reruns on television, the thinking goes, so why not bring that approach to digital content? (via <a href=”http://digiday.com/publishers/publishers-evergreen-content-strategy-make-the-old-new-again/”>Publishers have an updated evergreen strategy: Make the old new again | Digiday</a>)

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

MIT’s Tangible Media is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, like a table of living clay:

brucesterling:

designculturemind:

Tangible Media

MIT’s Tangible Media is coming along nicely,

"Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning."

*The tie-in with the projection-mapping is especially good.

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from Emergent Futures Tumblelog

Source youtube.com

Watch this great video of kids reacting to old computers, via haltamc:

They can swipe through a home screen, but can they figure out a command prompt?

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from

"The most dangerous thought you can have as a creative person is to think you know what you’re doing."

Brett Victor, talking at a Dropbox conference, takes attendees back to the year 1973, donning the uniform of an IBM systems engineer of the times, delivering his presentation on an overhead projector. The ’60s and early ’70s were a fertile time for CS ideas, reminds Victor, but even more importantly, it was a time of unfettered thinking, unconstrained by programming dogma, authority, and tradition. ‘The most dangerous thought that you can have as a creative person is to think that you know what you’re doing,’ explains Victor. ‘Because once you think you know what you’re doing you stop looking around for other ways of doing things and you stop being able to see other ways of doing things. You become blind.’ He concludes, ‘I think you have to say: “We don’t know what programming is. We don’t know what computing is. We don’t even know what a computer is.” And once you truly understand that, and once you truly believe that, then you’re free, and you can think anything.’”

Presented at Dropbox’s DBX conference on July 9, 2013.
All of the slides are available here: http://worrydream.com/dbx/

Posted on Wednesday, July 16th 2014

Google News has created an experimental newsroom in San Francisco to monitor the World Cup and turn popular search results into viral content, NPR reports.

But interestingly, Google is choosing to steer clear of negative headlines. 

"We’re also quite keen not to rub salt into the wounds," producer Sam Clohesy says, "and a negative story about Brazil won’t necessarily get a lot of traction in social."

Mobile marketing expert Rakesh Agrawal, CEO of reDesign mobile, says that’s just generally true. “People on social networks like Twitter and Facebook — they generally tend to share happy thoughts. If my son had an A in math today, I’m going to share that. But if my son got an F in math, that’s generally not something you’re going to see on social media.”

In old-school newsrooms, the saying goes: if it bleeds, it leads. Because this new newsroom is focused on getting content onto everyone’s smartphone, Agrawal says, editors may have another bias: to comb through the big data in search of happy thoughts.

Posted on Thursday, July 10th 2014

committeetoprotectjournalists:

Facebook, YouTube, Twitter Blocked in Iraq Amid Crisis

As Iraq faces a growing insurgency in the north that is threatening to pull the country apart, the country’s Ministry of Communications has reportedly blocked access to a number of social media sites.
Some Twitter users in Iraq, who have found ways to circumvent the restrictions, are saying that Facebook, YouTube and Twitter are all inaccessible. When users attempt to visit these sites they apparently see a message from the Iraqi communications ministry.

committeetoprotectjournalists:

Facebook, YouTube, Twitter Blocked in Iraq Amid Crisis

As Iraq faces a growing insurgency in the north that is threatening to pull the country apart, the country’s Ministry of Communications has reportedly blocked access to a number of social media sites.

Some Twitter users in Iraq, who have found ways to circumvent the restrictions, are saying that Facebook, YouTube and Twitter are all inaccessible. When users attempt to visit these sites they apparently see a message from the Iraqi communications ministry.

Posted on Friday, June 13th 2014

Reblogged from Committee to Protect Journalists

Source marketinginfographics

It may seem minor, but the new “thank” button in Wikipedia is a MAJOR leap forward. Signaling appreciation changes community dynamics

Andrew Lih, aka @fuzheado

Posted on Sunday, July 7th 2013

Facebook aims to become a 'newspaper for mobile' with new app

Facebook is aiming to become a newspaper for mobile devices, WSJ reports. “The social network has been quietly working on a service, internally called Reader, that displays content from Facebook users and publishers in a new visual format tailored for mobile devices, people with knowledge of the matter said.”

But owning news consumption will be a challenge for Facebook, analysts say. Both Twitter and LinkedIn have been pushing their own services aggressively, while Flipboard has more than 50 million users. “There are a lot of things people didn’t do on Facebook several years ago that they now do,” said Nate Elliot, a Forrester analyst. “But I imagine it’s going to be very hard” to retrain consumers to see Facebook as a go-to hub for news. Mr. Zuckerberg is watching the Reader project closely, one of the people with knowledge of the matter said, and he has provided input and reviewed aspects of the design at various turns. While Mr. Zuckerberg has made “move fast and break things” a Facebook company mantra, the development of Reader has been relatively slow and deliberate. The team has focused on creating a product experience that works on both tablets and smartphones, the person added, and it has explored different ways to highlight news content to users, including showing public posts that are trending on the site.

Posted on Monday, June 24th 2013

GI Joe and the invention of the viral video

The Verge:

At least as far as internet culture is concerned, [2003] was also the year of the “GI Joe PSAs”: 25 weird, short videos made from re-edited versions of ‘80s GI Joe cartoons. Before YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter were alive to launch a meme in a minute, the GI Joe PSAs went “viral” in a time when that idea didn’t even exist.

Posted on Thursday, May 9th 2013