About this site

THE FUTURE OF MEDIA STARTS.... HERE

CyberJournalist.net is the premier news and resource site about how the digital technology is transforming the media.

CyberJournalist.net has been named a top 100 digital media site by Cnet, recommended by dozens of publications, from the Columbia Journalism Review to Vanity Fair to USA TODAY, and been visited by readers in more than 200 countries.

CyberJournalist.net is published by Jonathan Dube, an award-winning digital media executive who founded the site in 2000. Dube is the former SVP & GM of AOL News & Information and Past President of the Online News Association.

Publishers are doing all they can to wring out more value from their existing body of content. The most common technique is to resurface popular old stories that (even just barely) pertain to a trending topic: Publishers will republish or re-share old bits of viral content in the hopes of striking traffic gold once again. People watch reruns on television, the thinking goes, so why not bring that approach to digital content? (via <a href=”http://digiday.com/publishers/publishers-evergreen-content-strategy-make-the-old-new-again/”>Publishers have an updated evergreen strategy: Make the old new again | Digiday</a>)

Publishers are doing all they can to wring out more value from their existing body of content. The most common technique is to resurface popular old stories that (even just barely) pertain to a trending topic: Publishers will republish or re-share old bits of viral content in the hopes of striking traffic gold once again. People watch reruns on television, the thinking goes, so why not bring that approach to digital content? (via <a href=”http://digiday.com/publishers/publishers-evergreen-content-strategy-make-the-old-new-again/”>Publishers have an updated evergreen strategy: Make the old new again | Digiday</a>)

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

What Writer's Block? Swedish Man and His Bot Have Authored 2.7 Million Wikipedia Articles

futurejournalismproject:

Via The Wall Street Journal:

Sverker Johansson could be the most prolific author you’ve never heard of.

Volunteering his time over the past seven years publishing to Wikipedia, the 53-year-old Swede can take credit for 2.7 million articles, or 8.5% of the entire collection, according to Wikimedia analytics, which measures the site’s traffic. His stats far outpace any other user, the group says.

He has been particularly prolific cataloging obscure animal species, including butterflies and beetles, and is proud of his work highlighting towns in the Philippines. About one-third of his entries are uploaded to the Swedish language version of Wikipedia, and the rest are composed in two versions of Filipino, one of which is his wife’s native tongue.

An administrator holding degrees in linguistics, civil engineering, economics and particle physics, he says he has long been interested in “the origin of things, oh, everything.”

It isn’t uncommon, however, for Wikipedia purists to complain about his method. That is because the bulk of his entries have been created by a computer software program—known as a bot. Critics say bots crowd out the creativity only humans can generate.

Mr. Johansson’s program scrubs databases and other digital sources for information, and then packages it into an article. On a good day, he says his “Lsjbot” creates up to 10,000 new entries.

That’s one way to go about it. Some Wikiepedia editors aren’t happy it though.

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from The FJP

Twitter: Innovation w product discipline

bijan:

I reject this idea that Twitter as a product hasn’t innovated over the years. 

Think back to the early version of Twitter that got me hooked and there are countless ways that Twitter has improved: mobile apps, search, conversations, photographs, analytics, native advertising, recommendations,Discover, retweets, hashtags, location/geotagging, Amplify, Twitter cards, as well as countless ways the product has been made easier to use. Plus Twitter has also made important acquisitions like Vine and others. 

But here is the important thing about all of that product goodness — it didn’t come at a cost that breaks the magic of Twitter. 

Contrast it to other products that continue to get bloated and heavy with clunky features. The posterchild is Microsoft Office but they are hardly the only ones. Actually most mature products (and early stage ones too) fall into this time honored trap. 

One of things I admire most about Twitter, the product is their discipline to add new things while keeping things remarkably simple. Simple & magical enough to inform, entertain, connect and delight hundreds of millions of people. 

Posted on Monday, July 14th 2014

Reblogged from Bijan Sabet

Google News has created an experimental newsroom in San Francisco to monitor the World Cup and turn popular search results into viral content, NPR reports.

But interestingly, Google is choosing to steer clear of negative headlines. 

"We’re also quite keen not to rub salt into the wounds," producer Sam Clohesy says, "and a negative story about Brazil won’t necessarily get a lot of traction in social."

Mobile marketing expert Rakesh Agrawal, CEO of reDesign mobile, says that’s just generally true. “People on social networks like Twitter and Facebook — they generally tend to share happy thoughts. If my son had an A in math today, I’m going to share that. But if my son got an F in math, that’s generally not something you’re going to see on social media.”

In old-school newsrooms, the saying goes: if it bleeds, it leads. Because this new newsroom is focused on getting content onto everyone’s smartphone, Agrawal says, editors may have another bias: to comb through the big data in search of happy thoughts.

Posted on Thursday, July 10th 2014

Remember Technorati&#8217;s once-authoritative blog ranking system? It&#8217;s dead.
From The Next Web:

There was once a time when Technorati.com meant something to online publishers. It was their professional reputation, and featuring on it was the goal of many. Technorati hosts its own ranking system to determine the influence of websites, based on their subject matter and a range of factors, including in- and outgoing links, which establish authority and credibility. It is the place where you want your site to rank high&#8230;
It’s notable, then, that Technorati actually quietly removed its ranking system — which was perhaps the best-known and most thorough of any blog index on the web — at the end of May, as noted by Business2community.com&#8230;.

Instead, the six-year-old company is focusing on developing its website advertising network. It claims to have “thousands” of partners, with a network that “boasts more than 100 million unique US users per month.”

Remember Technorati’s once-authoritative blog ranking system? It’s dead.

From The Next Web:

There was once a time when Technorati.com meant something to online publishers. It was their professional reputation, and featuring on it was the goal of many. Technorati hosts its own ranking system to determine the influence of websites, based on their subject matter and a range of factors, including in- and outgoing links, which establish authority and credibility. It is the place where you want your site to rank high…

It’s notable, then, that Technorati actually quietly removed its ranking system — which was perhaps the best-known and most thorough of any blog index on the web — at the end of May, as noted by Business2community.com….

Instead, the six-year-old company is focusing on developing its website advertising network. It claims to have “thousands” of partners, with a network that “boasts more than 100 million unique US users per month.”

Posted on Thursday, June 26th 2014

What happens to your Facebook life after you die?

What happens to your Facebook life after you die?

(Jump ahead to minute 7)

Posted on Friday, June 13th 2014

Helping viral hits go further

RebelMouse, the social-aggregation platform founded by Paul Berry — the former chief technology officer at Huffington Post — is relaunching as a full-fledged publishing system designed for media companies who want to control the social ecosystem around their content

image

"After a single month of publishing, [founder Paul] Berry says the site hit one million unique visitors, and after just three months it is getting more than 7.5 million visitors. Editors like using the site’s custom writing tools — the RebelMouse founder calls them a mashup of Medium, Tumblr and Huffington Post — but the platform also makes it easy to plug the content they create back into social networks like Facebook and then track what happens. And that allows publishers like The Dodo to build on whatever viral hits they do generate.

Posted on Sunday, June 8th 2014

It may seem minor, but the new “thank” button in Wikipedia is a MAJOR leap forward. Signaling appreciation changes community dynamics

Andrew Lih, aka @fuzheado

Posted on Sunday, July 7th 2013

The new science of memes

"Scientists are beginning to understand how the curiously addictive visual tropes known as ‘memes’ are born, why they die, and whether or not it’s possible to predict which will ‘go viral’ and be harvested by the night-soil merchants up at meme warehouses like Cheezburger.

For example:

  • Memes that hit an above-average peak of popularity at some point in their life are less likely, overall, to ultimately break the “success” threshold. Memes that are shared more consistently over time, rather than a great deal all at once, are more likely to ultimately go viral
  • Treating memes like genes tells us which are likely to spread
  • Memes could have seasonal patterns, or even follow the anxieties and fads of the day, as suggested by trends in the news
  • Memes have a half-life. They become popular, and then, taken as a whole, they are consumed and then tossed on the scrap-heap of history.

Posted on Monday, July 1st 2013