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THE FUTURE OF MEDIA STARTS.... HERE

CyberJournalist.net is the premier news and resource site about how the digital technology is transforming the media.

CyberJournalist.net has been named a top 100 digital media site by Cnet, recommended by dozens of publications, from the Columbia Journalism Review to Vanity Fair to USA TODAY, and been visited by readers in more than 200 countries.

CyberJournalist.net is published by Jonathan Dube, an award-winning digital media executive who founded the site in 2000. Dube is the former SVP & GM of AOL News & Information and Past President of the Online News Association.

The new science of memes

"Scientists are beginning to understand how the curiously addictive visual tropes known as ‘memes’ are born, why they die, and whether or not it’s possible to predict which will ‘go viral’ and be harvested by the night-soil merchants up at meme warehouses like Cheezburger.

For example:

  • Memes that hit an above-average peak of popularity at some point in their life are less likely, overall, to ultimately break the “success” threshold. Memes that are shared more consistently over time, rather than a great deal all at once, are more likely to ultimately go viral
  • Treating memes like genes tells us which are likely to spread
  • Memes could have seasonal patterns, or even follow the anxieties and fads of the day, as suggested by trends in the news
  • Memes have a half-life. They become popular, and then, taken as a whole, they are consumed and then tossed on the scrap-heap of history.

Posted on Monday, July 1st 2013

Here are the top 10 reasons for becoming a brand fan on Facebook.
Hint: Most people are already supporters of the brand.
You can access the full Syncapse study here.

Here are the top 10 reasons for becoming a brand fan on Facebook.

Hint: Most people are already supporters of the brand.

You can access the full Syncapse study here.

Posted on Friday, June 28th 2013

Facebook aims to become a 'newspaper for mobile' with new app

Facebook is aiming to become a newspaper for mobile devices, WSJ reports. “The social network has been quietly working on a service, internally called Reader, that displays content from Facebook users and publishers in a new visual format tailored for mobile devices, people with knowledge of the matter said.”

But owning news consumption will be a challenge for Facebook, analysts say. Both Twitter and LinkedIn have been pushing their own services aggressively, while Flipboard has more than 50 million users. “There are a lot of things people didn’t do on Facebook several years ago that they now do,” said Nate Elliot, a Forrester analyst. “But I imagine it’s going to be very hard” to retrain consumers to see Facebook as a go-to hub for news. Mr. Zuckerberg is watching the Reader project closely, one of the people with knowledge of the matter said, and he has provided input and reviewed aspects of the design at various turns. While Mr. Zuckerberg has made “move fast and break things” a Facebook company mantra, the development of Reader has been relatively slow and deliberate. The team has focused on creating a product experience that works on both tablets and smartphones, the person added, and it has explored different ways to highlight news content to users, including showing public posts that are trending on the site.

Posted on Monday, June 24th 2013

Very cool visualization of global tourism using Twitter data:
With the power of MapBox and Twitter data from Gnip, data artist Eric Fischer worked with the Gnip team to create a fully-browsable worldwide map of local allegiances.
Blue points on the map are Tweets posted by “Locals”: people who have tweeted in a city dated over a range of a month or more. Red points are Tweets posted by “Tourists”: people who seem to be Locals in a different city and who tweeted in this city for less than a month.

Very cool visualization of global tourism using Twitter data:

With the power of MapBox and Twitter data from Gnip, data artist Eric Fischer worked with the Gnip team to create a fully-browsable worldwide map of local allegiances.

Blue points on the map are Tweets posted by “Locals”: people who have tweeted in a city dated over a range of a month or more. Red points are Tweets posted by “Tourists”: people who seem to be Locals in a different city and who tweeted in this city for less than a month.

Posted on Wednesday, June 19th 2013

How Slate doubled its Facebook referrals

Online news magazine Slate doubled its Facebook referrals between the second quarter of 2012 and the first quarter of 2013. They did so by making it easier for readers to share content on Slate.com while also making strategic choices about which stories to post, how frequently to post and what time of day to post from their Page. Here are the details behind Slate’s success.

image

Posted on Friday, May 3rd 2013

Source developers.facebook.com

futurejournalismproject:

The Half Life of Shared Links
Via Bitly:

The mean half life of a link on twitter is 2.8 hours, on facebook it’s 3.2 hours and via ‘direct’ sources (like email or IM clients) it’s 3.4 hours. So you can expect, on average, an extra 24 minutes of attention if you post on facebook than if you post on twitter…
…Not all social sites follow this pattern. The surprise in the graph above is links that originate from youtube: these links have a half life of 7.4 hours! As clickers, we remain interested in links on youtube for a much longer period of time. You can see this dramatic difference between youtube and the other platforms for sharing links in the image above…
…Many links last a lot less than 2 hours; other more sticky links last longer than 11 hours over all the referrers. This leads us to believe that the lifespan of your link is connected more to what content it points to than on where you post it: on the social web it’s all about what you share, not where you share it!

H/T: Sanjiv Desai.

futurejournalismproject:

The Half Life of Shared Links

Via Bitly:

The mean half life of a link on twitter is 2.8 hours, on facebook it’s 3.2 hours and via ‘direct’ sources (like email or IM clients) it’s 3.4 hours. So you can expect, on average, an extra 24 minutes of attention if you post on facebook than if you post on twitter…

…Not all social sites follow this pattern. The surprise in the graph above is links that originate from youtube: these links have a half life of 7.4 hours! As clickers, we remain interested in links on youtube for a much longer period of time. You can see this dramatic difference between youtube and the other platforms for sharing links in the image above…

…Many links last a lot less than 2 hours; other more sticky links last longer than 11 hours over all the referrers. This leads us to believe that the lifespan of your link is connected more to what content it points to than on where you post it: on the social web it’s all about what you share, not where you share it!

H/T: Sanjiv Desai.

Posted on Wednesday, September 7th 2011

Reblogged from

Source futurejournalismproject