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THE FUTURE OF MEDIA STARTS.... HERE

CyberJournalist.net is the premier news and resource site about how the digital technology is transforming the media.

CyberJournalist.net has been named a top 100 digital media site by Cnet, recommended by dozens of publications, from the Columbia Journalism Review to Vanity Fair to USA TODAY, and been visited by readers in more than 200 countries.

CyberJournalist.net is published by Jonathan Dube, an award-winning digital media executive who founded the site in 2000. Dube is the former SVP & GM of AOL News & Information and Past President of the Online News Association.

bobbycaputo:

Arab-American Journalist’s Kiss Photo with Israeli Boyfriend Becomes Viral Symbol of Peace

As clashes between Hamas and the Israeli armed forces escalate and the death toll climbs with heartbreaking consistency, a photograph of an Arab-American journalist and her Israeli-American boyfriend kissing has gone viral, sparked a Twitter movement, and become a symbol of peace.

In the age of social media, it no longer has to be a photojournalist’s camera that captures the photo that will come to define a particular conflict. In 1967, the photo that became a symbol of peace and ‘flower power’ at the height of the Vietnam War was taken by French photographer Marc Riboud.

In 2014, the world has changed, and the photo quickly becoming a symbol of peace in the Middle East is actually a selfie.

Taken by Arab-American journalist Sulome Anderson and her Israeli-American boyfriend, the selfie shows them kissing while Anderson holds up a sign that says “Jews and Arabs Refuse To Be Enemies.”

(Continue Reading)

Posted on Tuesday, July 29th 2014

Reblogged from blogging is overrated

BuzzFeed Video is trying to change the definition of branded content by getting consumers to follow marketer content just like editorial. 

"These are viewers who have actively decided that this is a piece of content that speaks to them—and it happens that it is conjunction with a brand. I think that’s what the next level of branded video is about: really tapping into things like emotion and identity. When you can create that piece of content that speaks to somebody about they’re going through, it’s going to resonate better," said Jonathan Perelman, gm of video at BuzzFeed.

Posted on Tuesday, July 29th 2014

7 key takeaways from IAB’s study on in-feed sponsored content

  1. Despite demographic and content differences, business and entertainment news users are highly receptive to in-feed sponsored content if it is relevant, authoritative and trustworthy.
  2. General news users are the least receptive but also said that they can have a positive experience if the advertising is relevant, authoritative and trustworthy.
  3. Well done sponsored content can enhance the credibility of the site and the site’s credibly can enhance the perceived credibility of the in-feed sponsored content (33% lift in perceived credibility of the sponsored content when on credibly perceived news site)
  4. The fit between the site and the brand is critical to success with consumers.
  5. In-feed sponsored content is least useful for generating new brand awareness. 
  6. In-feed sponsored content is most useful for established brands that seek to enhance and differentiate their image, deepen existing consumer relationships, to launch brand extensions.
  7. The best in-feed sponsored content tells a story and fulfills the human need for a compelling narrative. 

Read the full study here.

Posted on Monday, July 28th 2014

fastcompany:

New predictive analytics are making Moneyball look obsolete.
At a workshop during the GigaOm Structure conference, Hensberger shared his next-level data crunching and the academic paper his team prepared for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. His team modeled MLB data to show with 74.5% accuracy what a pitcher is going to throw—and when.
Read More>

fastcompany:

New predictive analytics are making Moneyball look obsolete.

At a workshop during the GigaOm Structure conference, Hensberger shared his next-level data crunching and the academic paper his team prepared for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. His team modeled MLB data to show with 74.5% accuracy what a pitcher is going to throw—and when.

Read More>

Posted on Wednesday, July 23rd 2014

Reblogged from Fast Company

Publishers are doing all they can to wring out more value from their existing body of content. The most common technique is to resurface popular old stories that (even just barely) pertain to a trending topic: Publishers will republish or re-share old bits of viral content in the hopes of striking traffic gold once again. People watch reruns on television, the thinking goes, so why not bring that approach to digital content? (via <a href=”http://digiday.com/publishers/publishers-evergreen-content-strategy-make-the-old-new-again/”>Publishers have an updated evergreen strategy: Make the old new again | Digiday</a>)

Publishers are doing all they can to wring out more value from their existing body of content. The most common technique is to resurface popular old stories that (even just barely) pertain to a trending topic: Publishers will republish or re-share old bits of viral content in the hopes of striking traffic gold once again. People watch reruns on television, the thinking goes, so why not bring that approach to digital content? (via <a href=”http://digiday.com/publishers/publishers-evergreen-content-strategy-make-the-old-new-again/”>Publishers have an updated evergreen strategy: Make the old new again | Digiday</a>)

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

What Writer's Block? Swedish Man and His Bot Have Authored 2.7 Million Wikipedia Articles

futurejournalismproject:

Via The Wall Street Journal:

Sverker Johansson could be the most prolific author you’ve never heard of.

Volunteering his time over the past seven years publishing to Wikipedia, the 53-year-old Swede can take credit for 2.7 million articles, or 8.5% of the entire collection, according to Wikimedia analytics, which measures the site’s traffic. His stats far outpace any other user, the group says.

He has been particularly prolific cataloging obscure animal species, including butterflies and beetles, and is proud of his work highlighting towns in the Philippines. About one-third of his entries are uploaded to the Swedish language version of Wikipedia, and the rest are composed in two versions of Filipino, one of which is his wife’s native tongue.

An administrator holding degrees in linguistics, civil engineering, economics and particle physics, he says he has long been interested in “the origin of things, oh, everything.”

It isn’t uncommon, however, for Wikipedia purists to complain about his method. That is because the bulk of his entries have been created by a computer software program—known as a bot. Critics say bots crowd out the creativity only humans can generate.

Mr. Johansson’s program scrubs databases and other digital sources for information, and then packages it into an article. On a good day, he says his “Lsjbot” creates up to 10,000 new entries.

That’s one way to go about it. Some Wikiepedia editors aren’t happy it though.

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from The FJP

MIT’s Tangible Media is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, like a table of living clay:

brucesterling:

designculturemind:

Tangible Media

MIT’s Tangible Media is coming along nicely,

"Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning."

*The tie-in with the projection-mapping is especially good.

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from Emergent Futures Tumblelog

Source youtube.com

(via stoweboyd)

Posted on Thursday, July 17th 2014

Reblogged from Stowe Boyd